Taking a Look at the History of Diamonds [Infographic] – Jewellery Buyers Guide

Diamond jewellery is always beautiful to look at and even more luxurious to wear, but have you ever wondered where jewellery came from and how far jewellery buyers have come since the 1970s? Here is a quick look at the history or diamond and other jewellery.

The first diamond was believed to be discovered approximately 3,000 years ago in India. Diamonds were quite rare, and they were initially used in the Hungarian queen’s crown as a decoration. In 1477, Mary of Burgundy was the first lady to receive a diamond engagement ring from the Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a tradition that is still being followed today.

The Georgian and Early Victorian Periods

The period from 1714 until 1830 was known as the Georgian Period and this was a time where cameo broaches and earrings became a fashion statement. This was followed by the Early Victorian period between 1837 and 1860, where multi-colour gold work, floral sprays, scrollwork and animal themes were popular. Jewelry buyers also took a particular interest in enamel jewellery.

The Early Victorian Era was followed by the Mid Victorian (Grand) period that lasted from 1860 until 1885. During this period, pendants where more delicate and the use of pearls and colour stones were very popular. The years between 1894 and 1923 marked the Arts and Crafts movement whereby mainly silver was used with uncut stones. Colour was much more prominent too. In 1902, the largest gemstone, the Cullinan Diamond, was discovered in a mine in South Africa.

The Art Nouveau and Art Deco Period

The Art Nouveau Period followed between 1980 and 1915, where Louis Comfort Tiffany, an American Jeweller, and the French Art Nouveau Jeweller Rene Jules Lalique, were the leading designers in this period. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s father was the owner of Tiffany & Co, the place all jewellery buyers have come since the 1970s? Here is a quick look at the history or diamond and other jewellery.

The first diamond was believed to be discovered approximately 3,000 years ago in India. Diamonds were quite rare, and they were initially used in the Hungarian queen’s crown as a decoration. In 1477, Mary of Burgundy was the first lady to receive a diamond engagement ring from the Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a tradition that is still being followed today.

The Georgian and Early Victorian Periods

The period from 1714 until 1830 was known as the Georgian Period and this was a time where cameo broaches and earrings became a fashion statement. This was followed by the Early Victorian period between 1837 and 1860, where multi-colour gold work, floral sprays, scrollwork and animal themes were popular. Jewelry buyers also took a particular interest in enamel jewelry.

The Early Victorian Era was followed by the Mid Victorian (Grand) period that lasted from 1860 until 1885. During this period, pendants where more delicate and the use of pearls and colour stones were very popular. The years between 1894 and 1923 marked the Arts and Crafts movement whereby mainly silver was used with uncut stones. Colour was much more prominent too. In 1902, the largest gemstone, the Cullinan Diamond, was discovered in a mine in South Africa.

The Art Nouveau and Art Deco Period

The Art Nouveau Period followed between 1980 and 1915, where Louis Comfort Tiffany, an American Jeweller, and the French Art Nouveau Jeweller Rene Jules Lalique, were the leading designers in this period. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s father was the owner of Tiffany & Co, the place all jewelry buyers visit to purchase luxurious diamond jewellery.

During the mid-century (1950’s), a modernised influence led to mixed cut diamonds being used and this has led to the 1960s period that had little restrictions when it came to materials. Yellow gold, silver and platinum were used to set natural and “drusy” gemstones. In the 1980s until the 1990s, the diamond industry was revolutionised by an equality in the workplace, where women embraced men as equals. Popular television shows like Dallas “drove” this movement and created a demand for glamour and bulky jewelry pieces.

For more info, have a look at the below infographic:

jewelry buyers

 

Looking back at the history of diamonds and the way jewellery has evolved, we are privileged to have modern technology to design these masterpieces. Diamond jewellery is particularly popular and diamonds will remain a preferred stone for centuries to come. So, if you have unwanted diamond jewellery that you would like to sell, they might just be worth more than you think.

Liquid Finance can help you to sell your diamond jewellery at the right price. As experienced jewelry buyers, we can provide you with an accurate valuation on your items and provide you with a secure and private environment. Contact us today to find out how you can sell your unwanted diamond jewellery. buyers” href=”http://liquidfin.co.za/”>jewellery buyers visit to purchase luxurious diamond jewellery.

During the mid-century (1950’s), a modernised influence led to mixed cut diamonds being used and this has led to the 1960s period that had little restrictions when it came to materials. Yellow gold, silver and platinum were used to set natural and “drusy” gemstones. In the 1980s until the 1990s, the diamond industry was revolutionised by an equality in the workplace, where women embraced men as equals. Popular television shows like Dallas “drove” this movement and created a demand for glamour and bulky jewellery pieces.

For more info, have a look at the below infographic:

Diamond jewellery is always beautiful to look at and even more luxurious to wear, but have you ever wondered where jewellery came from and how we far <a title=jewellery buyers have come since the 1970s? Here is a quick look at the history or diamond and other jewellery.

The first diamond was believed to be discovered approximately 3,000 years ago in India. Diamonds were quite rare, and they were initially used in the Hungarian queen’s crown as a decoration. In 1477, Mary of Burgundy was the first lady to receive a diamond engagement ring from the Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a tradition that is still being followed today.

The Georgian and Early Victorian Periods

The period from 1714 until 1830 was known as the Georgian Period and this was a time where cameo broaches and earrings became a fashion statement. This was followed by the Early Victorian period between 1837 and 1860, where multi-colour gold work, floral sprays, scrollwork and animal themes were popular. Jewelry buyers also took a particular interest in enamel jewelry.

The Early Victorian Era was followed by the Mid Victorian (Grand) period that lasted from 1860 until 1885. During this period, pendants where more delicate and the use of pearls and colour stones were very popular. The years between 1894 and 1923 marked the Arts and Crafts movement whereby mainly silver was used with uncut stones. Colour was much more prominent too. In 1902, the largest gemstone, the Cullinan Diamond, was discovered in a mine in South Africa.

The Art Nouveau and Art Deco Period

The Art Nouveau Period followed between 1980 and 1915, where Louis Comfort Tiffany, an American Jeweller, and the French Art Nouveau Jeweller Rene Jules Lalique, were the leading designers in this period. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s father was the owner of Tiffany & Co, the place all jewellery buyers visit to purchase luxurious diamond jewellery.

During the mid-century (1950’s), a modernised influence led to mixed cut diamonds being used and this has led to the 1960s period that had little restrictions when it came to materials. Yellow gold, silver and platinum were used to set natural and “drusy” gemstones. In the 1980s until the 1990s, the diamond industry was revolutionised by an equality in the workplace, where women embraced men as equals. Popular television shows like Dallas “drove” this movement and created a demand for glamour and bulky jewellery pieces.

For more info, have a look at the below infographic:

jewelry buyers

 

Looking back at the history of diamonds and the way jewellery has evolved, we are privileged to have modern technology to design these masterpieces. Diamond jewellery is particularly popular and diamonds will remain a preferred stone for centuries to come. So, if you have unwanted diamond jewellery that you would like to sell, they might just be worth more than you think.

Liquid Finance can help you to sell your diamond jewellery at the right price. As experienced jewelry buyers, we can provide you with an accurate valuation on your items and provide you with a secure and private environment. Contact us today to find out how you can sell your unwanted diamond jewellery. buyers” width=”471″ height=”2643″ />

 

Looking back at the history of diamonds and the way jewellery has evolved, we are privileged to have modern technology to design these masterpieces. Diamond jewellery is particularly popular and diamonds will remain a preferred stone for centuries to come. So, if you have unwanted diamond jewellery that you would like to sell, they might just be worth more than you think.

Liquid Finance can help you to sell your diamond jewellery at the right price. As experienced Diamond jewellery is always beautiful to look at and even more luxurious to wear, but have you ever wondered where jewellery came from and how we far jewellery buyers have come since the 1970s? Here is a quick look at the history or diamond and other jewellery.

The first diamond was believed to be discovered approximately 3,000 years ago in India. Diamonds were quite rare, and they were initially used in the Hungarian queen’s crown as a decoration. In 1477, Mary of Burgundy was the first lady to receive a diamond engagement ring from the Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a tradition that is still being followed today.

The Georgian and Early Victorian Periods

The period from 1714 until 1830 was known as the Georgian Period and this was a time where cameo broaches and earrings became a fashion statement. This was followed by the Early Victorian period between 1837 and 1860, where multi-colour gold work, floral sprays, scrollwork and animal themes were popular. Jewelry buyers also took a particular interest in enamel jewellery.

The Early Victorian Era was followed by the Mid Victorian (Grand) period that lasted from 1860 until 1885. During this period, pendants where more delicate and the use of pearls and colour stones were very popular. The years between 1894 and 1923 marked the Arts and Crafts movement whereby mainly silver was used with uncut stones. Colour was much more prominent too. In 1902, the largest gemstone, the Cullinan Diamond, was discovered in a mine in South Africa.

The Art Nouveau and Art Deco Period

The Art Nouveau Period followed between 1980 and 1915, where Louis Comfort Tiffany, an American Jeweller, and the French Art Nouveau Jeweller Rene Jules Lalique, were the leading designers in this period. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s father was the owner of Tiffany & Co, the place all jewellery buyers visit to purchase luxurious diamond jewellery.

During the mid-century (1950’s), a modernised influence led to mixed cut diamonds being used and this has led to the 1960s period that had little restrictions when it came to materials. Yellow gold, silver and platinum were used to set natural and “drusy” gemstones. In the 1980s until the 1990s, the diamond industry was revolutionised by an equality in the workplace, where women embraced men as equals. Popular television shows like Dallas “drove” this movement and created a demand for glamour and bulky jewellery pieces.

For more info, have a look at the below infographic:

jewelry buyers

 

Looking back at the history of diamonds and the way jewellery has evolved, we are privileged to have modern technology to design these masterpieces. Diamond jewellery is particularly popular and diamonds will remain a preferred stone for centuries to come. So, if you have unwanted diamond jewellery that you would like to sell, they might just be worth more than you think.

Liquid Finance can help you to sell your diamond jewellery at the right price. As experienced jewelry buyers, we can provide you with an accurate valuation on your items and provide you with a secure and private environment. Contact us today to find out how you can sell your unwanted diamond jewellery. buyers, we can provide you with an accurate valuation on your items and provide you with a secure and private environment. Contact us today to find out how you can sell your unwanted diamond Diamond jewellery is always beautiful to look at and even more luxurious to wear, but have you ever wondered where jewellery came from and how we far jewellery buyers have come since the 1970s? Here is a quick look at the history or diamond and other jewellery.

The first diamond was believed to be discovered approximately 3,000 years ago in India. Diamonds were quite rare, and they were initially used in the Hungarian queen’s crown as a decoration. In 1477, Mary of Burgundy was the first lady to receive a diamond engagement ring from the Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a tradition that is still being followed today.

The Georgian and Early Victorian Periods

The period from 1714 until 1830 was known as the Georgian Period and this was a time where cameo broaches and earrings became a fashion statement. This was followed by the Early Victorian period between 1837 and 1860, where multi-colour gold work, floral sprays, scrollwork and animal themes were popular. Jewelry buyers also took a particular interest in enamel jewellery.

The Early Victorian Era was followed by the Mid Victorian (Grand) period that lasted from 1860 until 1885. During this period, pendants where more delicate and the use of pearls and colour stones were very popular. The years between 1894 and 1923 marked the Arts and Crafts movement whereby mainly silver was used with uncut stones. Colour was much more prominent too. In 1902, the largest gemstone, the Cullinan Diamond, was discovered in a mine in South Africa.

The Art Nouveau and Art Deco Period

The Art Nouveau Period followed between 1980 and 1915, where Louis Comfort Tiffany, an American Jeweller, and the French Art Nouveau Jeweller Rene Jules Lalique, were the leading designers in this period. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s father was the owner of Tiffany & Co, the place all jewellery buyers visit to purchase luxurious diamond jewellery.

During the mid-century (1950’s), a modernised influence led to mixed cut diamonds being used and this has led to the 1960s period that had little restrictions when it came to materials. Yellow gold, silver and platinum were used to set natural and “drusy” gemstones. In the 1980s until the 1990s, the diamond industry was revolutionised by an equality in the workplace, where women embraced men as equals. Popular television shows like Dallas “drove” this movement and created a demand for glamour and bulky jewelry pieces.

For more info, have a look at the below infographic:

jewelry buyers

 

Looking back at the history of diamonds and the way jewelry has evolved, we are privileged to have modern technology to design these masterpieces. Diamond jewellery is particularly popular and diamonds will remain a preferred stone for centuries to come. So, if you have unwanted diamond jewellery that you would like to sell, they might just be worth more than you think.

Liquid Finance can help you to sell your diamond jewellery at the right price. As experienced jewelry buyers, we can provide you with an accurate valuation on your items and provide you with a secure and private environment. Contact us today to find out how you can sell your unwanted diamond jewellery..

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